Effects of Stimulus Frequency and Intensity on the Middle Components of the Averaged Auditory Electroencephalic Response Middle components (la6tency 8–50 msec) of the averaged auditory electroencephalic response (AAER), evoked by brief duration tone bursts, were recorded from 11 normal-hearing subjects. Latency and amplitude measurements were made on five peaks (Na, Pa, Nb, Pb, and Nc) of the AAER waveforms recorded for 27 experimental conditions: three conditions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1977
Effects of Stimulus Frequency and Intensity on the Middle Components of the Averaged Auditory Electroencephalic Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aaron R. Thornton
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Maurice I. Mendel
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Charles V. Anderson
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1977
Effects of Stimulus Frequency and Intensity on the Middle Components of the Averaged Auditory Electroencephalic Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 81-94. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.81
History: Received November 24, 1975 , Accepted September 6, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 81-94. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.81
History: Received November 24, 1975; Accepted September 6, 1976

Middle components (la6tency 8–50 msec) of the averaged auditory electroencephalic response (AAER), evoked by brief duration tone bursts, were recorded from 11 normal-hearing subjects. Latency and amplitude measurements were made on five peaks (Na, Pa, Nb, Pb, and Nc) of the AAER waveforms recorded for 27 experimental conditions: three conditions of stimulus frequency (250, 1000, and 4000 Hz) at each of nine conditions of signal intensity (a no-stimulus control and 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 dB re: group thresholds). Latency for each peak decreased with increased stimulus frequency, and it tended to decrease slightly with increases in stimulus intensity. Amplitude input-output characteristics varied with stimulus frequency and response peak. In general, the most linear input-output characteristics occurred for the early peaks and high stimulus frequencies. Characteristics for later peaks and lower frequencies tended to asymptote at moderate stimulus intensities. Between-subject variability was not much greater than within-subject variability for the single event auditory evoked potential (AEP). The variance of the AEP, however, was nearly as great (as much as two-thirds) as the variance of the background EEG, despite the large difference between AEP and background EEG amplitude.

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