Overt and Covert Aspects of Adult Speech Perception The relationship between verbal report and cardiac orienting response measures of speech discrimination in adult listeners was examined in two experiments using stimuli and paradigms previously employed in studies of infant speech perception. The results of Experiment I revealed that all listeners, those who reported discrimination of a synthetic [ba-ga] ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1977
Overt and Covert Aspects of Adult Speech Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip A. Morse
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Lewis A. Leavitt
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Cynthia L. Miller
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Rhonda C. Romero
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1977
Overt and Covert Aspects of Adult Speech Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 40-54. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.40
History: Received September 8, 1975 , Accepted August 30, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 40-54. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.40
History: Received September 8, 1975; Accepted August 30, 1976

The relationship between verbal report and cardiac orienting response measures of speech discrimination in adult listeners was examined in two experiments using stimuli and paradigms previously employed in studies of infant speech perception. The results of Experiment I revealed that all listeners, those who reported discrimination of a synthetic [ba-ga] change (Group D) as well as those who did not (Group ND), demonstrated cardiac discrimination of the stimulus shift. However, this pattern of cardiac activity, both at stimulus onset and the shift, was found to be different in these two groups of listeners. Experiment II replicated the Group D results using a slightly different cardiac paradigm and quasinatural speech syllables. The implications of these findings for developmental research on speech perception with older infants, children, and populations with language disorders are discussed.

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