Observer Bias as a Factor in Neonatal Hearing Screening To evaluate observer bias as a possible factor influencing neonatal hearing testing, two trained observers were asked to evaluate the behavior of 200 neonates at a moment the observers thought a stimulus was being presented. Observers were receiving masking noise, and when the stimulus button was pressed a stimulus might ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1977
Observer Bias as a Factor in Neonatal Hearing Screening
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • George T. Mencher
    Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Clinic, Halifax
  • Barbara McCulloch
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • A. J. Derbyshire
    University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago
  • Rich Dethlefs
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1977
Observer Bias as a Factor in Neonatal Hearing Screening
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 27-34. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.27
History: Received April 21, 1975 , Accepted March 24, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 27-34. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.27
History: Received April 21, 1975; Accepted March 24, 1976

To evaluate observer bias as a possible factor influencing neonatal hearing testing, two trained observers were asked to evaluate the behavior of 200 neonates at a moment the observers thought a stimulus was being presented. Observers were receiving masking noise, and when the stimulus button was pressed a stimulus might or might not be delivered to the child. Results suggest that observer bias is not a factor when arousal is the only acceptable response and is clearly defined, and the observers are limited to a yes-no decision. Sequential analysis of infant response patterns is presented and a specific test scoring protocol is outlined.

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