Effect of Vicarious Punishment on Stuttering Frequency This investigation explored the effect of vicarious response-contingent stimulation on the frequency of stuttering. Twenty adult stutterers spoke for 20 minutes, then observed a speaker on a videotape for 10 minutes, and then spoke for an additional 20 minutes. In one condition the speaker on the videotape was a severe ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1977
Effect of Vicarious Punishment on Stuttering Frequency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard Martin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Samuel Haroldson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1977
Effect of Vicarious Punishment on Stuttering Frequency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 21-26. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.21
History: Received March 3, 1976 , Accepted September 2, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 21-26. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.21
History: Received March 3, 1976; Accepted September 2, 1976

This investigation explored the effect of vicarious response-contingent stimulation on the frequency of stuttering. Twenty adult stutterers spoke for 20 minutes, then observed a speaker on a videotape for 10 minutes, and then spoke for an additional 20 minutes. In one condition the speaker on the videotape was a severe stutterer who experienced a dramatic reduction in stuttering under a contingent time-out procedure. In a second condition, the videotape speaker was a severe stutterer who received no experimental manipulations. In the third condition, the videotape speaker was a normal talker who received no experimental manipulations. All subjects participated in all three conditions. Twenty of the stutterers experienced a significant decrease in stuttering as a result of watching the videotape model who received contingent time-out. The subjects did not exhibit significant changes in stuttering after watching the severe stutterer who received no treatment or the normal talker.

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