Auditory Reaction Times for Functional and Nonfunctional Hearing Loss Differences in decision processes as measured by auditory reaction times of simulated or actual functional hearing-loss subjects and nonfunctional subjects were investigated. Sensation level data are presented that reflect marked differences between such individuals with regard to probability of response, and means and standard deviations of auditory reaction times. Means ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1977
Auditory Reaction Times for Functional and Nonfunctional Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas J. Wood
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Edward L. Goshorn
    Veterans Administration Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Robert W. Peters
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1977
Auditory Reaction Times for Functional and Nonfunctional Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 177-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.177
History: Received September 30, 1974 , Accepted September 9, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1977, Vol. 20, 177-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.2001.177
History: Received September 30, 1974; Accepted September 9, 1976

Differences in decision processes as measured by auditory reaction times of simulated or actual functional hearing-loss subjects and nonfunctional subjects were investigated. Sensation level data are presented that reflect marked differences between such individuals with regard to probability of response, and means and standard deviations of auditory reaction times. Means and standard deviations of auditory reaction times for nonfunctional subjects are greatly reduced when compared with results obtained by simulated or actual functional subjects. Probability of response data was less effective in differentiating functional from nonfunctional subjects. Individuals who were trained to simulate hearing loss responded in a manner similar to functional patients. The results of this study suggest that auditory reaction time measures can be employed to determine the existence or nonexistence of functional hearing loss with considerable accuracy.

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