Semantic Relations Used by Normal and Language-Impaired Children at Stage I Two-word utterances of four language-impaired children at Brown’s Stage I level of linguistic development were compared with two-word utterances of four young normal children at the same linguistic level to determine any differences between the two groups in the use of a set of 10 basic semantic relations. Type-token ratios ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1976
Semantic Relations Used by Normal and Language-Impaired Children at Stage I
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia P. Freedman
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Robert L. Carpenter
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1976
Semantic Relations Used by Normal and Language-Impaired Children at Stage I
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 784-795. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.784
History: Received June 23, 1975 , Accepted June 25, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 784-795. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.784
History: Received June 23, 1975; Accepted June 25, 1976

Two-word utterances of four language-impaired children at Brown’s Stage I level of linguistic development were compared with two-word utterances of four young normal children at the same linguistic level to determine any differences between the two groups in the use of a set of 10 basic semantic relations. Type-token ratios for each semantic relation were used to compare use of semantic relations between groups. A significant difference was obtained for only one relation, with the language-impaired group demonstrating greater diversity in the use of the introducer + entity relation than the normal group. The findings indicated that at the Stage I level of linguistic development, the language-impaired children demonstrated a linguistic system no different than the system of normal Stage I children. The findings are discussed relative to possible cognitive and linguistic strategies involved in language acquisition. It is suggested that some language-impaired children rather than being deficient in their ability to understand and code the basic semantic relations demonstrate a deficit in the higher, more complex aspects of the linguistic coding system.

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