Normal and Retarded Children’s Understanding of Semantic Relations in Different Verbal Contexts The effect of different semantic relations presented in different verbal contexts to language retarded and normal children at the one- and two-word stage of development was studied. No significant difference was found between the performance of mentally retarded language-disordered and normal children on the verbal comprehension task. Both groups of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1976
Normal and Retarded Children’s Understanding of Semantic Relations in Different Verbal Contexts
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Felson Duchan
    State University College at Buffalo, New York
  • Joan Good Erickson
    University of Illinois, Champaign
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1976
Normal and Retarded Children’s Understanding of Semantic Relations in Different Verbal Contexts
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 767-776. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.767
History: Received March 22, 1974 , Accepted May 3, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 767-776. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.767
History: Received March 22, 1974; Accepted May 3, 1976

The effect of different semantic relations presented in different verbal contexts to language retarded and normal children at the one- and two-word stage of development was studied. No significant difference was found between the performance of mentally retarded language-disordered and normal children on the verbal comprehension task. Both groups of children performed best on the possessive, next on the agent-object, then actor-action, and poorest on the locative relations. Finally, nonsense, telegraphic, and expanded contexts did make a difference in the children’s understandings with expanded being the best, telegraphic next, and nonsense contexts poorest. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

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