Divergent Semantic Behavior in Aphasia The purpose of the present study was to examine the divergent semantic behaviors of 30 persons with aphasia in comparison to these same behaviors in a group of 30 normal individuals. Specifically, this study examined fluency or the number of ideas produced, flexibility or the variety of ideas produced, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1976
Divergent Semantic Behavior in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roberta Chapey
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York
  • Seymour Rigrodsky
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York
  • Eleanor B. Morrison
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1976
Divergent Semantic Behavior in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 664-677. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.664
History: Received January 6, 1976 , Accepted September 2, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 664-677. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.664
History: Received January 6, 1976; Accepted September 2, 1976

The purpose of the present study was to examine the divergent semantic behaviors of 30 persons with aphasia in comparison to these same behaviors in a group of 30 normal individuals. Specifically, this study examined fluency or the number of ideas produced, flexibility or the variety of ideas produced, and communality within each subject group and between the two groups. Results support the existence of the divergent mental operation and indicate that persons with aphasia are impaired in their ability to generate semantic responses under this operation. Therefore, speech pathologists may wish to include divergent tasks in their evaluation procedures and plan therapy directed toward the retrieval of divergent responses.

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