Stuttering and Sentence Length The purpose of this study was to determine whether sentence length influences the frequency of stuttering. Fourteen stutterers read, in random order, 20 long and 20 short sentences. The long sentences were constructed by means of additions to the short ones: for example, She learned to swim and She learned ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1976
Stuttering and Sentence Length
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gaye B. Tornick
    Brooklyn College, New York
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1976
Stuttering and Sentence Length
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 651-654. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.651
History: Received August 8, 1975 , Accepted March 22, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1976, Vol. 19, 651-654. doi:10.1044/jshr.1904.651
History: Received August 8, 1975; Accepted March 22, 1976

The purpose of this study was to determine whether sentence length influences the frequency of stuttering. Fourteen stutterers read, in random order, 20 long and 20 short sentences. The long sentences were constructed by means of additions to the short ones: for example, She learned to swim and She learned to swim in the clear water of the lake. Only the words that the pairs of sentences had in common were compared for occurrence of stuttering. Significantly more stuttering was found on the same words when they served as the initial segments of long sentences than when they stood alone as short sentences. The results seem to give evidence of the role of motor planning, or anticipated motor complexity in stuttering.

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