Electrophysiological and Acoustic Correlates of Stress and Stress Perception A theory of stress is proposed. On the basis of a series of acoustic, pneumographic, electrophysiological, and perceptual measurements, it is hypothesized that stress is a function of greater speaking effort. The terms dynamic, melodic, quantitative accent, prominence by stress, prominence by length, prominence by intonation are considered to be ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1966
Electrophysiological and Acoustic Correlates of Stress and Stress Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ivan Fónagy
    Hungarian Academy of Science, Institute of Linguistics, Budapest, Hungary
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1966
Electrophysiological and Acoustic Correlates of Stress and Stress Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1966, Vol. 9, 231-244. doi:10.1044/jshr.0902.231
History: Received January 3, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1966, Vol. 9, 231-244. doi:10.1044/jshr.0902.231
History: Received January 3, 1966

A theory of stress is proposed. On the basis of a series of acoustic, pneumographic, electrophysiological, and perceptual measurements, it is hypothesized that stress is a function of greater speaking effort. The terms dynamic, melodic, quantitative accent, prominence by stress, prominence by length, prominence by intonation are considered to be misleading. The projection of greater effort on the acoustic level as well as perceptual cues of stress are studied.

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