Speech Discrimination in Sensori-Neural Hearing Loss: Two Experiments on the Role of Intensity Speech discrimination was investigated in subjects with sensori-neural dysacousis. Maximum discrimination for speech in the population studied generally occurred at intensity levels below those at which aural amplitude distortion may be introduced into the auditory system. Articulation functions for speech heard at various hearing-aid gain levels by experienced wearers showed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1966
Speech Discrimination in Sensori-Neural Hearing Loss: Two Experiments on the Role of Intensity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phillip A. Yantis
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Joseph P. Millin
    Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center, and Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Irving Shapiro
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1966
Speech Discrimination in Sensori-Neural Hearing Loss: Two Experiments on the Role of Intensity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1966, Vol. 9, 178-193. doi:10.1044/jshr.0902.178
History: Received November 1, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1966, Vol. 9, 178-193. doi:10.1044/jshr.0902.178
History: Received November 1, 1965

Speech discrimination was investigated in subjects with sensori-neural dysacousis. Maximum discrimination for speech in the population studied generally occurred at intensity levels below those at which aural amplitude distortion may be introduced into the auditory system. Articulation functions for speech heard at various hearing-aid gain levels by experienced wearers showed that these subjects preferred gain levels close to those at which PB-max scores were obtained, and that the shapes of the articulation curves were quite variable from one subject to another.

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