Stuttering: Discoordination of Phonation with Articulation and Respiration Complexity of phonatory and respiratory adjustments was systematically simplified in 30 adult stutterers under three speaking conditions: voiced, whispered, and articulated without phonation. Stuttering was reduced considerably when whispering and was practically eliminated when articulating silently. The possibility that stuttering consistently results from complexity of phonatory coordinations with articulation and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1976
Stuttering: Discoordination of Phonation with Articulation and Respiration
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William Perkins
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Joanna Rudas
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Linda Johnson
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Jody Bell
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1976
Stuttering: Discoordination of Phonation with Articulation and Respiration
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 509-522. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.509
History: Received March 19, 1975 , Accepted January 23, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 509-522. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.509
History: Received March 19, 1975; Accepted January 23, 1976

Complexity of phonatory and respiratory adjustments was systematically simplified in 30 adult stutterers under three speaking conditions: voiced, whispered, and articulated without phonation. Stuttering was reduced considerably when whispering and was practically eliminated when articulating silently. The possibility that stuttering consistently results from complexity of phonatory coordinations with articulation and respiration was strongly supported. Increased speaking rates under conditions that decreased stuttering seemed to be evidence that efficient rhythmical flow of speech is facilitated by simplification of phonatory and respiratory adjustments.

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