Elicited Imitation of Selected Features of Two American English Dialects in Head Start Children Three measures were used to check the bidialectal imitative facility of 100 black, white, and Spanish-speaking Head Start children. In general, blacks and Spanish-speaking subjects performed more accurately on black English markers than on Standard English markers and whites, the reverse. When the children did make an error on the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1976
Elicited Imitation of Selected Features of Two American English Dialects in Head Start Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Irene Stephens
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1976
Elicited Imitation of Selected Features of Two American English Dialects in Head Start Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 493-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.493
History: Received August 4, 1975 , Accepted January 21, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 493-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.493
History: Received August 4, 1975; Accepted January 21, 1976

Three measures were used to check the bidialectal imitative facility of 100 black, white, and Spanish-speaking Head Start children. In general, blacks and Spanish-speaking subjects performed more accurately on black English markers than on Standard English markers and whites, the reverse. When the children did make an error on the feature marker they usually substituted the opposing dialectal marker. Blacks and Spanish-speaking subjects were more apt to be accurate on the total sentence when it was given in black English. Several explanations are offered for group similarities and differences.

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