Complement Structures in the Language of Deaf Students Four hundred and twenty-seven deaf students (age 10 to 19 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) judged the grammaticality of sample sentences which contained infinitival or gerundive complements. Results indicated improvement with increasing age for deaf students. Even the youngest hearing students consistently obtained higher scores ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1976
Complement Structures in the Language of Deaf Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. P. Quigley
    University of Illinois, Champaign
  • R. B. Wilbur
    University of Illinois, Champaign
  • D. S. Montanelli
    University of Illinois, Champaign
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1976
Complement Structures in the Language of Deaf Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 448-457. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.448
History: Received April 9, 1975 , Accepted January 21, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1976, Vol. 19, 448-457. doi:10.1044/jshr.1903.448
History: Received April 9, 1975; Accepted January 21, 1976

Four hundred and twenty-seven deaf students (age 10 to 19 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) judged the grammaticality of sample sentences which contained infinitival or gerundive complements. Results indicated improvement with increasing age for deaf students. Even the youngest hearing students consistently obtained higher scores than most of the deaf students. Although the function of the complement (as subject or object) did not make a difference in performance, the type of complement did. POSS-ing complements were easier than for-to complements. Verb type also influenced performance.

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