Assessment of Nasalization in the Speech of Deaf Children Nasality is widely recognized as a problem in the speech of many deaf people. This paper describes one approach to the assessment of nasalization and to the development of visual aids to assist in the training of velopharyngeal control. The approach involves detection of the velopharyngeal opening during voiced sounds ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1976
Assessment of Nasalization in the Speech of Deaf Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. N. Stevens
    Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • R. S. Nickerson
    Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • A. Boothroyd
    Clarke School for the Deaf, Northampton, Massachusetts
  • A. M. Rollins
    Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1976
Assessment of Nasalization in the Speech of Deaf Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 393-416. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.393
History: Received May 27, 1974 , Accepted December 31, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 393-416. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.393
History: Received May 27, 1974; Accepted December 31, 1975

Nasality is widely recognized as a problem in the speech of many deaf people. This paper describes one approach to the assessment of nasalization and to the development of visual aids to assist in the training of velopharyngeal control. The approach involves detection of the velopharyngeal opening during voiced sounds by means of a small accelerometer attached to the nose, and presentation of the accelerometer output on a computer-controlled visual display. The display may be used as a training aid, or for the purpose of analyzing either recorded or live speech. Objective data are presented on some of the properties of the accelerometer output for the speech of people with normal hearing and of a number of children whose hearing is severely impaired. These data show inadequate velopharyngeal control, particularly improper nasalization of certain vowels, for a significant number of the deaf children. For a group of the hearing-impaired children, subjective judgments of the adequacy of velopharyngeal control and of other speech attributes were obtained. Correlations among these judgments and relations between judgments of adequacy of velopharyngeal control and the objective measures of nasalization are shown. Some comments are made on the development of procedures for the training of velopharyngeal control using the display as an aid.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access