The Ability of Stutterers and Nonstutterers to Initiate and Terminate Phonation during Production of an Isolated Vowel This study tested the hypothesis that stutterers have difficulty initiating and terminating phonation independent of the acts of running speech and stuttering. Ten young adult stutterers served as the experimental group. They were matched as a group for age and sex with 10 normal speakers. Subjects from both groups were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1976
The Ability of Stutterers and Nonstutterers to Initiate and Terminate Phonation during Production of an Isolated Vowel
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin R. Adams
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Paul Hayden
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1976
The Ability of Stutterers and Nonstutterers to Initiate and Terminate Phonation during Production of an Isolated Vowel
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 290-296. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.290
History: Received November 6, 1974 , Accepted January 20, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 290-296. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.290
History: Received November 6, 1974; Accepted January 20, 1976

This study tested the hypothesis that stutterers have difficulty initiating and terminating phonation independent of the acts of running speech and stuttering. Ten young adult stutterers served as the experimental group. They were matched as a group for age and sex with 10 normal speakers. Subjects from both groups were tested individually. The experimental task required that subjects start and stop phonation as quickly as possible upon hearing each member of a series of 1000-Hz pure tones appear and then disappear. Subjects' vocalizations were permanently recorded on an optical oscillograph. Results showed that both groups improved (shortened) their voice initiation and termination times from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Typically, however, the stutterers were significantly slower than the control subjects on most of the temporal measures.

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