Traits Attributed to Stuttering and Normally Fluent Males To determine if a stereotype of the “typical stutterer” exists and to identify possible differences in that stereotype due to exposure to stuttering, seven groups of subjects having a wide range of possible exposure to stutterers rated four hypothetical concepts (typical eight-year-old male, typical eight-year-old male stutterer, typical adult male, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1976
Traits Attributed to Stuttering and Normally Fluent Males
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Lee Woods
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1976
Traits Attributed to Stuttering and Normally Fluent Males
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 267-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.267
History: Received April 21, 1975 , Accepted October 16, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1976, Vol. 19, 267-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1902.267
History: Received April 21, 1975; Accepted October 16, 1975

To determine if a stereotype of the “typical stutterer” exists and to identify possible differences in that stereotype due to exposure to stuttering, seven groups of subjects having a wide range of possible exposure to stutterers rated four hypothetical concepts (typical eight-year-old male, typical eight-year-old male stutterer, typical adult male, and typical adult male stutterer) on 25 scales arranged in a semantic differential format. These bipolar scales were derived from words previously judged by speech clinicians as descriptive of stutterers and antonyms of those words. It was concluded that a strong stereotype of a stutterer’s personal characteristics exists, that the stereotype is predominantly unfavorable, that the stereotype is essentially unaffected by amount of exposure to actual stutterers, and that the traits attributed to boys and men who stutter are similar. Some implications of the study are discussed.

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