Identification and Discrimination of Vowel-Consonant Syllables in Listeners with Sensorineural Hearing Loss The speech encoding ability of eight persons with sensorineural hearing loss and three persons with normal hearing was studied in identification and discrimination paradigms. In the identification task a feature analysis of transmitted information for VC syllables was used to study encoding ability. Transmitted information was reduced from normal for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1975
Identification and Discrimination of Vowel-Consonant Syllables in Listeners with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte Reed
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1975
Identification and Discrimination of Vowel-Consonant Syllables in Listeners with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 773-794. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.773
History: Received April 17, 1975 , Accepted August 22, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 773-794. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.773
History: Received April 17, 1975; Accepted August 22, 1975

The speech encoding ability of eight persons with sensorineural hearing loss and three persons with normal hearing was studied in identification and discrimination paradigms. In the identification task a feature analysis of transmitted information for VC syllables was used to study encoding ability. Transmitted information was reduced from normal for persons with hearing loss, indicating a loss of ability to encode consonants. In the discrimination task, coding ability was studied by measuring reaction times (RTs) for “same” and “different” decisions. The RTs for individuals with impaired hearing were found to be significantly different from those subjects with normal hearing. The trend was for faster “same” than “different” RTs among the normal subjects and faster “different” than “same” RTs among the hearing-impaired persons. The results are interpreted as indicating that the two groups of subjects used different processing modes in discriminating between pairs of phonemes.

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