The Effect of Combining Low- and High-Frequency Passbands on Consonant Recognition in the Hearing Impaired A comparison was made of the effect on consonant-recognition scores when a low-frequency passband and a high-frequency passband were presented to either the same ear or opposite ears of hearing-impaired subjects. The Fairbanks Rhyme Test was filtered into two bands—240–480 Hz (low band) and 1020–2040 Hz (high band). The high ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1975
The Effect of Combining Low- and High-Frequency Passbands on Consonant Recognition in the Hearing Impaired
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Franklin
    San Francisco State University, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1975
The Effect of Combining Low- and High-Frequency Passbands on Consonant Recognition in the Hearing Impaired
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 719-727. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.719
History: Received January 31, 1974 , Accepted June 13, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 719-727. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.719
History: Received January 31, 1974; Accepted June 13, 1975

A comparison was made of the effect on consonant-recognition scores when a low-frequency passband and a high-frequency passband were presented to either the same ear or opposite ears of hearing-impaired subjects. The Fairbanks Rhyme Test was filtered into two bands—240–480 Hz (low band) and 1020–2040 Hz (high band). The high band was presented at 10 dB re threshold at 1500 Hz to the better ear of six subjects with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing losses. The low band was presented to the same (ear receiving high band) or the opposite ear at levels of 10, 30, or 50 dB SL re threshold at 360 Hz in that ear. When the low band and high band were added to the same ear, there was little change in the consonant-recognition score, but, when presented to opposite ears, there was a significant increase in the score, at each of the three sensation levels.

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