The Distribution of Perceptual Cues in English Prevocalic Fricatives Two experiments involving deletion of selected segments of syllables were undertaken to investigate the distribution of perceptual cues and the role of right-to-left coarticulation in fricative vowel monosyllables. From 12 original syllables (/f, θ, s, ∫/ in combination with /i, u, a/), manipulations were made so that a group of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1975
The Distribution of Perceptual Cues in English Prevocalic Fricatives
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Conrad LaRiviere
    University of Missouri, Kansas City
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri, Kansas City
  • Eve Herriman
    University of Missouri, Kansas City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1975
The Distribution of Perceptual Cues in English Prevocalic Fricatives
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 613-622. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.613
History: Received November 26, 1974 , Accepted May 1, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1975, Vol. 18, 613-622. doi:10.1044/jshr.1804.613
History: Received November 26, 1974; Accepted May 1, 1975

Two experiments involving deletion of selected segments of syllables were undertaken to investigate the distribution of perceptual cues and the role of right-to-left coarticulation in fricative vowel monosyllables. From 12 original syllables (/f, θ, s, ∫/ in combination with /i, u, a/), manipulations were made so that a group of listeners were exposed to transitionless syllables and isolated segments of syllables. Consonant and vowel recognition scores under these conditions showed that right-to-left coarticulation effects are perceptible, but do not contribute to consonant identification. The vocalic effects shown for many monosyllables were consistent with a normalization hypothesis. In agreement with previous literature, spectral cues in frication determine /s, ∫/ recognition. These cues also contribute to the identification of many /f/ and /θ/ syllables.

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