Intelligibility and Short-Term Memory in the Repetition of Digit Strings Twenty-eight normal subjects heard seven digits masked by noise, and repeated either (a) the first three digits, (b) the last three digits, (c) all seven digits, or (d) all seven digits after saying “zero.” Over the range of intelligibility tested (approximately 60% to 100%), accuracy of seven-digit repetition improves linearly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1964
Intelligibility and Short-Term Memory in the Repetition of Digit Strings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kent M. Dallett
    University of California, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1964
Intelligibility and Short-Term Memory in the Repetition of Digit Strings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 362-368. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.362
History: Received April 29, 1964
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 362-368. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.362
History: Received April 29, 1964

Twenty-eight normal subjects heard seven digits masked by noise, and repeated either (a) the first three digits, (b) the last three digits, (c) all seven digits, or (d) all seven digits after saying “zero.” Over the range of intelligibility tested (approximately 60% to 100%), accuracy of seven-digit repetition improves linearly as accuracy of three-digit repetition improves, with the average slope being near 1.00. These data were interpreted to mean that the decrement in intelligibility that results from masking is accompanied by an added decrement in short-term memory.

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