Word Length and Discrimination Behavior of Aphasics This study was undertaken to investigate the phenomenon of the adverse effect of word length on the discrimination behavior of aphasics. Ten aphasics and 10 age-and-sex matched controls were assessed on 312 match-to-sample tasks using automated techniques. A mixed factorial design permitted the stimuli to be presented in 36 different ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1964
Word Length and Discrimination Behavior of Aphasics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judy G. Cohen
    University of California at Los Angeles, California
  • Allan E. Edwards
    Wadsworth Hospital, V. A. Center, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1964
Word Length and Discrimination Behavior of Aphasics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 343-348. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.343
History: Received July 1, 1964
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 343-348. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.343
History: Received July 1, 1964

This study was undertaken to investigate the phenomenon of the adverse effect of word length on the discrimination behavior of aphasics. Ten aphasics and 10 age-and-sex matched controls were assessed on 312 match-to-sample tasks using automated techniques. A mixed factorial design permitted the stimuli to be presented in 36 different combinations. Three hypotheses were explored: unreliable scanning behavior, the meaning and pronounceability of the discriminanda, and the ability to discriminate amongst perceptual noise. The latter was found to be the only variable which had an adverse effect on the aphasic’s discrimination.

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