Stuttering and Auditory Central Nervous System Disorder The observation that delayed side-tone affects speech fluency has renewed interest in the possibility of a neurophysiological factor in stuttering. This investigation was designed to explore the possibility that stutterers have an auditory central nervous system disorder. Thirty stutterers and 10 non-stutterers were equated on the basis of age, auditory ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1964
Stuttering and Auditory Central Nervous System Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hugo H. Gregory
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1964
Stuttering and Auditory Central Nervous System Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 335-341. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.335
History: Received January 17, 1964
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1964, Vol. 7, 335-341. doi:10.1044/jshr.0704.335
History: Received January 17, 1964

The observation that delayed side-tone affects speech fluency has renewed interest in the possibility of a neurophysiological factor in stuttering. This investigation was designed to explore the possibility that stutterers have an auditory central nervous system disorder.

Thirty stutterers and 10 non-stutterers were equated on the basis of age, auditory acuity, and intelligence. Tests of personality and motor coordination, and tests for pure-tone-loudness balances, the median plane localization of pure tones, and the discrimination of monaurally- and binaurally-presented distorted speech were administered.

Findings did not support the hypothesis that stutterers have an auditory central nervous system disorder.

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