Auditory Behavior in the Human Neonate: A Preliminary Report This report of a pilot study with 170 unselected neonates considers the effects of signal variables and certain random factors upon auditory behavior. Signal variables differentially affect the incidence of response (response-ratio), the kinds of behavior elicited during response (response-pattern), and the strength of response. Complexity is the prime determinant ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1964
Auditory Behavior in the Human Neonate: A Preliminary Report
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rita B. Eisenberg
    Research Institute, St. Joseph Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
  • Elizabeth J. Griffin
    Research Institute, St. Joseph Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
  • David Baird Coursin
    Research Institute, St. Joseph Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
  • Mary Alice Hunter
    Lancaster County Schools, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1964
Auditory Behavior in the Human Neonate: A Preliminary Report
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1964, Vol. 7, 245-269. doi:10.1044/jshr.0703.245
History: Received March 6, 1964
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1964, Vol. 7, 245-269. doi:10.1044/jshr.0703.245
History: Received March 6, 1964

This report of a pilot study with 170 unselected neonates considers the effects of signal variables and certain random factors upon auditory behavior. Signal variables differentially affect the incidence of response (response-ratio), the kinds of behavior elicited during response (response-pattern), and the strength of response. Complexity is the prime determinant of response-ratio; response-pattern is affected by frequency and perhaps by duration (below 300 msec). High frequency stimulation elicits behavior which is unique in many ways, and certain aspects of behavior vary systematically with age. All aspects of auditory behavior are modified by activity state, which in turn is systematically altered by repeated stimulation, hunger, and other factors: the response-ratio function resembles adult “cue function” while systematic changes in response-pattern support the “law of initial values” and an “awake-alert-aware” continuum which has been postulated for the ascending reticular formation.

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