Evaluation of Methods of Estimating Sub-Glottal Air Pressure The following measures were simultaneously recorded as each of 10 adult male subjects phonated vowels at a variety of frequency and intensity levels: (a) intraesophageal pressure sensed by a small balloon inserted into the esophagus, (b) intratracheal pressure sensed by a hypodermic needle inserted into the trachea, and (c) lung ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1964
Evaluation of Methods of Estimating Sub-Glottal Air Pressure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luvern H. Kunze
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1964
Evaluation of Methods of Estimating Sub-Glottal Air Pressure
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1964, Vol. 7, 151-164. doi:10.1044/jshr.0702.151
History: Received June 17, 1963
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1964, Vol. 7, 151-164. doi:10.1044/jshr.0702.151
History: Received June 17, 1963

The following measures were simultaneously recorded as each of 10 adult male subjects phonated vowels at a variety of frequency and intensity levels: (a) intraesophageal pressure sensed by a small balloon inserted into the esophagus, (b) intratracheal pressure sensed by a hypodermic needle inserted into the trachea, and (c) lung volume recorded by a respirometer.

The study tested the validity of obtaining subglottal air pressure: (a) through the direct use of intra-esophageal pressure values, (b) through the use of the drop in intra-esophageal pressure which results when phonation is interrupted with the vocal folds abducted, and lung volume held constant, and (c) through the use of intra-tracheal pressure values. Results suggest that method (b) provides a valid estimate of subglottal pressure under conditions of sustained phonation, while method (c) provides a valid and reliable measure during sustained phonation and during connected speech where changes being recorded occurred at syllabic rates. Under no experimental conditions did method (a) provide a valid estimate of subglottal pressure.

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