An Evaluation of the Bekesy Ascending Descending Gap A Bekesy Ascending Descending Gap Evaluation (BADGE) procedure is described for distinguishing between organic and nonorganic hearing loss. This BADGE procedure involves a comparison of the differences between the following 1 000 cps discrete frequency Bekesy tracing types: (1) continuous tone with tracing begun well below threshold, (2) pulsed tone ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1964
An Evaluation of the Bekesy Ascending Descending Gap
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William H. Hood
    Veterans Administration Regional Office, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Richard A. Campbell
    Veterans Administration Regional Office, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Charles L. Hutton
    Veterans Administration Regional Office, Atlanta, Georgia.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1964
An Evaluation of the Bekesy Ascending Descending Gap
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1964, Vol. 7, 123-132. doi:10.1044/jshr.0702.123
History: Received December 16, 1963
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1964, Vol. 7, 123-132. doi:10.1044/jshr.0702.123
History: Received December 16, 1963

A Bekesy Ascending Descending Gap Evaluation (BADGE) procedure is described for distinguishing between organic and nonorganic hearing loss. This BADGE procedure involves a comparison of the differences between the following 1 000 cps discrete frequency Bekesy tracing types: (1) continuous tone with tracing begun well below threshold, (2) pulsed tone with tracing begun well below threshold, and (3) pulsed tone with tracing begun well above threshold. These gaps were examined for two groups of 27 each, one containing those individuals judged to display only organic hearing loss and the other containing those individuals judged to display nonorganic hearing loss. Relationships between Bekesy thresholds, differences between Bekesy thresholds, and estimates of “best hearing loss” were examined. The continuous ascending thresholds early in the one minute tracing were found to correlate most closely with the best hearing loss estimates. Correlations between the size of the gaps between tracings and the discrepancy between a Bekesy threshold and the best estimates were low. The nonorganic group more commonly displayed greater, readily visible, gaps between the ascending and descending tracings than did the organic group. The BADGE test is offered as a clinically useful device for differentiating between non-organic and organic hearing losses.

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