Some Observations on Type V Bekesy Tracings Jerger and Herer (1961) were the first to report an apparent relationship between functional hearing loss and the Type V Bekesy pattern. Several recent studies have added substantial support to the original observation, although the number of subjects on whom these findings are based is still limited. The present study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1963
Some Observations on Type V Bekesy Tracings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laszlo Stein
    Veterans Administration, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1963
Some Observations on Type V Bekesy Tracings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1963, Vol. 6, 339-348. doi:10.1044/jshr.0604.339
History: Received August 5, 1963
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1963, Vol. 6, 339-348. doi:10.1044/jshr.0604.339
History: Received August 5, 1963

Jerger and Herer (1961) were the first to report an apparent relationship between functional hearing loss and the Type V Bekesy pattern. Several recent studies have added substantial support to the original observation, although the number of subjects on whom these findings are based is still limited. The present study was undertaken to provide additional information on: (a) the frequency of occurrence of the Type V Bekesy tracing, (b) the manner and degree to which the interrupted tracing drops below the continuous tracing, and (c) the possible existence of additional signs of functionality in the Bekesy audiogram. Bekesy audiometry was undertaken with 100 veterans referred for audiologic examination. Thirty showed other evidence of functional hearing loss. Of these 30 subjects, 17 or 57% recorded Type V patterns and an additional nine recorded Bekesy patterns that could not be classified. In total, 26 of 30 or 87% of subjects with nonorganic hearing loss recorded Type V or unclassifiable Bekesy patterns. The remaining three subjects in this group recorded Type II or Type IV tracings. These findings suggest that the occurrence of either a Type V or unclassifiable Bekesy pattern should alert the audiologist to the possibility of functional hearing loss.

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