Further Studies of Nonverbal Learning and Aphasia This research study follows a previous paper on the performance of adult aphasics tested with a modified form of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. It investigates the effects of varying the order of presentation of the three sorting concepts or problems on the overall task-learning rate, the percentage of error ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1963
Further Studies of Nonverbal Learning and Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald S. Tikofsky
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Gale L. Reynolds
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1963
Further Studies of Nonverbal Learning and Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1963, Vol. 6, 329-337. doi:10.1044/jshr.0604.329
History: Received May 3, 1963
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1963, Vol. 6, 329-337. doi:10.1044/jshr.0604.329
History: Received May 3, 1963

This research study follows a previous paper on the performance of adult aphasics tested with a modified form of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. It investigates the effects of varying the order of presentation of the three sorting concepts or problems on the overall task-learning rate, the percentage of error responses and the percentage of perseverative error. It is found that varying the order of the concepts does not effect the task difficulty, as measured by these indices.

Statistical and interpretative analyses of the data also investigate the nature of performance improvement patterns. It is found that any significant improvement is due to the elimination of nonperseverative errors, while the proportion of perseverative responses remains fairly constant. The aphasics' inability to generalize problem solution methods and possible techniques for reducing perseveration, in addition to an evaluation of this task as an aphasia research instrument, are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access