Articles  |   September 1963
Monaural Versus Binaural Discrimination for Normal Listeners
Article Information
Articles   |   September 1963
Monaural Versus Binaural Discrimination for Normal Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1963, Vol. 6, 263-269. doi:10.1044/jshr.0603.263
History: Received May 23, 1963
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1963, Vol. 6, 263-269. doi:10.1044/jshr.0603.263
History: Received May 23, 1963

Normal hearing adults demonstrated approximately 20% better intelligibility scores for monosyllabic words presented binaurally (with a background of conversation) than to these words presented monaurally.

The test materials were recorded on dual-channel tape through two head-mounted microphones. These microphones were directed toward each of three speakers who in turn produced the monosyllabic words while two simultaneous conversations were carried on by four other participants. Throughout the recording session the experimenters attempted to preserve as naturalistic a situation as possible. The 18 subjects with normal hearing listened through earphones to a single channel of this tape presented monaurally and to both channels delivered binaurally. The difference between the monaural and binaural intelligibility scores is discussed in terms of image-separation in space.

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