The Effect of Examiner Social Behavior on Children’s Articulation Test Performance Forty-eight first- and second-grade children with /r/ or /s/ errors met with an articulation examiner once a week for three consecutive weeks. During each session, the investigator role-played social behaviors of a supportive examiner (S) or a non-supportive examiner (N) (Relationship Segment) and then administered a Vocal Imitation Task and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
The Effect of Examiner Social Behavior on Children’s Articulation Test Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
The Effect of Examiner Social Behavior on Children’s Articulation Test Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 659-672. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.659
History: Received July 2, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 659-672. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.659
History: Received July 2, 1971

Forty-eight first- and second-grade children with /r/ or /s/ errors met with an articulation examiner once a week for three consecutive weeks. During each session, the investigator role-played social behaviors of a supportive examiner (S) or a non-supportive examiner (N) (Relationship Segment) and then administered a Vocal Imitation Task and an imitative Articulation Task (Testing Segment). Subjects were divided into four groups balanced by sex, error sound, grade, and therapy experience. The sequence of experimental conditions for each group was Group 1 (SSS); Group 2 (NNN); Group 3 (SNS); and Group 4 (NSN). Two questions were posed: Do supportive versus nonsupportive examiner social behaviors affect articulation performance? Do differences in examiner social behaviors affect children’s test-retest reliability? No main or interaction effects for the type of examiner behaviors were obtained on either dependent variable. Comparison of the Pearson correlation coefficients for each group indicated that Group 1 obtained the highest temporal reliability, 0.92, while Groups 2, 3, and 4 obtained average coefficients of 0.67, 0.76, and 0.62, respectively. Clinical and theoretical implications of these data point to the value of using intensive designs for further study of interpersonal variables in the clinical process.

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