The Development of the LOT-Bekesy Test for Nonorganic Hearing Loss During Experiment 1, 10 normal adults maintained the loudness of 1 kHz tones at 50 and 80 dB SPL via the Bekesy audiometer. Loudness memory tracings were compared for one continuous and six pulsed conditions in an attempt to define the temporal parameters which are related to the Type V ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
The Development of the LOT-Bekesy Test for Nonorganic Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karl W. Hattler
    Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D. C.
  • 1 This article is a manuscript submitted to the Evaluation Subcommittee, Committee on Scientific Affairs, and was awarded the Junior Scientist Award for 1970. Publication of this manuscript is part of that award and it appears here in its original form.
    This article is a manuscript submitted to the Evaluation Subcommittee, Committee on Scientific Affairs, and was awarded the Junior Scientist Award for 1970. Publication of this manuscript is part of that award and it appears here in its original form.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
The Development of the LOT-Bekesy Test for Nonorganic Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 605-617. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.605
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 605-617. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.605

During Experiment 1, 10 normal adults maintained the loudness of 1 kHz tones at 50 and 80 dB SPL via the Bekesy audiometer. Loudness memory tracings were compared for one continuous and six pulsed conditions in an attempt to define the temporal parameters which are related to the Type V Bekesy pattern. At both intensities tracking levels increased in SPL with a decrease in the duty cycle of pulsed signals. Within Experiment 2, the lengthened off-time (LOT) test employed a 20% duty cycle pulsed tone for comparison with the 100% continuous tone tracing. LOT test results were compared to conventional fixed-frequency Bekesy results which employs a 50% pulsed tone. LOT signals yielded significantly more Type V separation of pulsed and continuous tracings among the nonorganic patients than conventional Bekesy signals thus yielding a higher rate of correct identification. Threshold tracings for organic patients were unaffected by lengthening the off time from the conventional 200 to 800 msec. For Experiment 3 the LOT-Bekesy test was administered to 340 unselected patients in a clinical setting. The test correctly identified 95% of the nonorganic patients and 99.6% of the organic group for an overall efficiency of 98.3%. The LOT test appears to have some advantages over established screening tests for nonorganicity.

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