Reports of Parental Attitudes by Stuttering and by Nonstuttering Children Thirty-four male stutterers (17 mild and 17 moderate-severe) and 34 nonstutterers, all in the sixth and seventh grades of school, completed the Children’s Report of Parent Behavior Inventory (CRPBI) for both parents. The stutterers tended to view their parents as behaving with less control and hostility and with more love ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
Reports of Parental Attitudes by Stuttering and by Nonstuttering Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
Reports of Parental Attitudes by Stuttering and by Nonstuttering Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 596-604. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.596
History: Received August 4, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 596-604. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.596
History: Received August 4, 1970

Thirty-four male stutterers (17 mild and 17 moderate-severe) and 34 nonstutterers, all in the sixth and seventh grades of school, completed the Children’s Report of Parent Behavior Inventory (CRPBI) for both parents. The stutterers tended to view their parents as behaving with less control and hostility and with more love and autonomy than did the nonstutterers. The degree of severity of stuttering was not an influential factor on the reported parental behavior.

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