Evaluation of Modified Rhyme Test Results from Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners Four lists of the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) were administered to 9 normal-hearing and 50 impaired-hearing subjects. The stimuli were spoken by a male speaker with test conditions designed to yield 96, 83, 75, and 96% correct responses by normal listeners. Normal subjects performed within the expected normal limits. Impaired-hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
Evaluation of Modified Rhyme Test Results from Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Earleen F. Elkins
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
Evaluation of Modified Rhyme Test Results from Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 589-595. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.589
History: Received February 9, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 589-595. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.589
History: Received February 9, 1970

Four lists of the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) were administered to 9 normal-hearing and 50 impaired-hearing subjects. The stimuli were spoken by a male speaker with test conditions designed to yield 96, 83, 75, and 96% correct responses by normal listeners. Normal subjects performed within the expected normal limits. Impaired-hearing subjects had significantly lower scores and did not show the proportional decrease for the most difficult condition. The performance of subjects grouped by degree of hearing loss showed that increasing noise did not affect MRT scores differentially, nor did MRT scores decrease significantly with increasing speech reception thresholds (SRTs). When a slight amount of noise accompanied the MRT, a significant relationship was shown with clinically obtained W-22 scores. Correlational analysis among five measures of speech-discrimination ability and six measures of threshold sensitivity supported other studies with regard to the frequency region important for the perception of monosyllabic stimuli at suprathreshold levels.

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