Consonant Intelligibility: Reliability and Validity of a Speech Assessment Procedure Eighteen subjects, diagnosed as having velopharyngeal incompetency or velopharyngeal insufficiency, recorded 50-item word lists and samples of contextual speech under two experimental conditions, with and without palatal lift type speech-aid appliance. Lateral head roentgenograms were made during the phonation of /i/ in the two experimental conditions. Three groups of untrained ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
Consonant Intelligibility: Reliability and Validity of a Speech Assessment Procedure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leo J. Kipfmueller
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • T. David Prins
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
Consonant Intelligibility: Reliability and Validity of a Speech Assessment Procedure
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 559-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.559
History: Received April 28, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 559-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.559
History: Received April 28, 1970

Eighteen subjects, diagnosed as having velopharyngeal incompetency or velopharyngeal insufficiency, recorded 50-item word lists and samples of contextual speech under two experimental conditions, with and without palatal lift type speech-aid appliance. Lateral head roentgenograms were made during the phonation of /i/ in the two experimental conditions. Three groups of untrained listeners identified initial consonants of the recorded word lists, and a group of trained listeners used rating scales to judge articulation and nasality differences from the contextual speech samples. Correlations between the speech and velopharyngeal measures revealed that (1) different groups of untrained listeners yielded reliable consonant identification scores under different listening conditions (r = 0.95, 0.98); (2) consonant identification scores were highly related to scores resulting from trained listener articulation judgments (rho = 0.78); (3) consonant identification scores and articulation judgment scores were similarly related to velopharyngeal lumen size (rho = 0.52, 0.48); (4) neither the type of consonant identification error nor the judgments of hypernasality difference was significantly correlated to change in size of the velopharyngeal port.

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