The Effects of Signal Rise Time and Duration on the Early Components of the Auditory Evoked Cortical Response The effects of signal rise time and duration on the early components of the auditory evoked cortical response were studied in 20 subjects. Tone bursts were presented at 1000 Hz at various rise times and durations. No consistent effects of signal duration on the latency or amplitude of the early ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
The Effects of Signal Rise Time and Duration on the Early Components of the Auditory Evoked Cortical Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul H. Skinner
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • Frank Antinoro
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
The Effects of Signal Rise Time and Duration on the Early Components of the Auditory Evoked Cortical Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 552-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.552
History: Received April 10, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 552-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.552
History: Received April 10, 1970

The effects of signal rise time and duration on the early components of the auditory evoked cortical response were studied in 20 subjects. Tone bursts were presented at 1000 Hz at various rise times and durations. No consistent effects of signal duration on the latency or amplitude of the early response were observed. The effects of signal rise time yielded no consistent change in peak latency but revealed a dramatic effect on peak amplitude. Amplitude decreased markedly with slower rise times. Stimuli presented with slow rise times resulted in instability of the wave form, while click stimuli produced remarkably stable responses from trial to trial.

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