The Audiometric Evaluation of Adult Aphasics Sixty-seven adult aphasics were tested audiometrically using ascending and descending approaches to threshold. The three lowest hearing levels at which responses were obtained for each of the approaches were recorded. The severity of aphasia in each patient, and the degree to which each manifested behavioral problems often associated with brain ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
The Audiometric Evaluation of Adult Aphasics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christy Leslie Ludlow
    New York University Medical Center, New York City, New York
  • Linda Peck Swisher
    New York University Medical Center, New York City, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
The Audiometric Evaluation of Adult Aphasics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 535-543. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.535
History: Received May 6, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 535-543. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.535
History: Received May 6, 1969

Sixty-seven adult aphasics were tested audiometrically using ascending and descending approaches to threshold. The three lowest hearing levels at which responses were obtained for each of the approaches were recorded. The severity of aphasia in each patient, and the degree to which each manifested behavioral problems often associated with brain damage, were evaluated. These data were related to his responses to audiometric testing. Those patients who did not respond adequately were those with severe aphasia who manifested particular behavioral problems, for example, an inappropriate social affect. The effect of the testing procedure on the hearing level and the variability of the responses recorded was investigated in two groups of aphasics matched for age. The responses of the less aphasic group did not differ with the approach to threshold used. Comparable responses were found in the more aphasic group with the descending approach; however, the hearing levels recorded with ascending approach were less sensitive, which resulted in greater response variability for this group.

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