The Adaptation Effect for Six Types of Speech Disfluency Each of 121 stutterers and 121 nonstutterers read a passage three times consecutively. The following types of speech disfluency were identified from tape recordings of the readings: part-word repetition, word repetition, phrase repetition, interjection of sounds and syllables, revision, and disrhythmic phonation. With the exception of revision and interjection for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
The Adaptation Effect for Six Types of Speech Disfluency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Franklin H. Silverman
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
The Adaptation Effect for Six Types of Speech Disfluency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 525-530. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.525
History: Received March 25, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 525-530. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.525
History: Received March 25, 1970

Each of 121 stutterers and 121 nonstutterers read a passage three times consecutively. The following types of speech disfluency were identified from tape recordings of the readings: part-word repetition, word repetition, phrase repetition, interjection of sounds and syllables, revision, and disrhythmic phonation. With the exception of revision and interjection for stutterers, the adaptation effect was observed for each type of disfluency in both groups of subjects. These data are generally consistent with the hypothesis that the adaptation effect, as it has traditionally been studied in oral reading, does not differentiate stutterers from nonstutterers.

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