Auditory and Audiovisual Reception of Words in Low-Frequency Noise by Children with Normal Hearing and by Children with Impaired Hearing Common words (monosyllables, trochees, spondees) were presented in low-frequency noise to children who attempted to detect their acoustic patterns or to recognize them under a range of acoustic speech-to-noise (S/N) ratios. Both profoundly deaf (−10 dB) and severely hearing-impaired children (−17 dB) required higher S/N ratios for auditory detection of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1971
Auditory and Audiovisual Reception of Words in Low-Frequency Noise by Children with Normal Hearing and by Children with Impaired Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Norman P. Erber
    Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1971
Auditory and Audiovisual Reception of Words in Low-Frequency Noise by Children with Normal Hearing and by Children with Impaired Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 496-512. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.496
History: Received September 9, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1971, Vol. 14, 496-512. doi:10.1044/jshr.1403.496
History: Received September 9, 1970

Common words (monosyllables, trochees, spondees) were presented in low-frequency noise to children who attempted to detect their acoustic patterns or to recognize them under a range of acoustic speech-to-noise (S/N) ratios. Both profoundly deaf (−10 dB) and severely hearing-impaired children (−17 dB) required higher S/N ratios for auditory detection of words than did children with normal hearing (−23 dB). The normals (92%) were superior to the severely hearing-impaired group (57%) in auditory recognition of words in noise, while the deaf group (3%) were unable to recognize words by ear alone. The deaf group were poor even at classifying the stimulus words by stress pattern. Provision of acoustic cues increased the audio-visual (AV) scores of normal-hearing and severely hearing-impaired subjects 54% and 33% respectively above lipreading alone, but it improved the lipreading performance of profoundly deaf subjects only 9%. Improvement in AV recognition depended for all groups upon their detection of acoustic cues for speech. The profoundly deaf children achieved their maximum AV scores only at a higher S/N ratio (+5 dB) than that for the severely hearing-impaired group (0 dB), who in turn required a higher S/N ratio for maximum AV recognition than did the normals (−10 dB).

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