Formant Frequency Characteristics of Esophageal Speech Highly representative esophageal vowels (N = 191) selected from a listening experiment were subjected to formant frequency analysis. The results of this acoustic analysis showed that: (1) mean vowel formant frequencies for female esophageal speakers were higher than for males, (2) the changes in formant frequency from vowel to vowel ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
Formant Frequency Characteristics of Esophageal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy L. Sisty
    Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
Formant Frequency Characteristics of Esophageal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 439-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.439
History: Received September 27, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 439-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.439
History: Received September 27, 1971

Highly representative esophageal vowels (N = 191) selected from a listening experiment were subjected to formant frequency analysis. The results of this acoustic analysis showed that: (1) mean vowel formant frequencies for female esophageal speakers were higher than for males, (2) the changes in formant frequency from vowel to vowel were systematic and were essentially the same for normal and esophageal speakers, and (3) average vowel formant frequency values for esophageal speakers were consistently higher than those reported for normal speakers (Peterson and Barney, 1952). The data strongly support the hypothesis that removal of the larynx does alter vocal-cavity transmission characteristics. A reduction in effective vocal tract length for laryngectomized persons using esophageal speech is suggested.

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