Behavioral and Human Evoked Response Thresholds as a Function of Frequency This experiment measured the correspondence between the method of adjustment quiet threshold and the human vertex response (AER) quiet threshold, when various frequency signals were used. Behavioral and AER thresholds of four subjects were measured, using tone bursts of 250, 500, 4000, or 6000 Hz. The tone bursts had a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
Behavioral and Human Evoked Response Thresholds as a Function of Frequency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald Henderson
    Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
Behavioral and Human Evoked Response Thresholds as a Function of Frequency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 390-394. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.390
History: Received June 18, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 390-394. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.390
History: Received June 18, 1971

This experiment measured the correspondence between the method of adjustment quiet threshold and the human vertex response (AER) quiet threshold, when various frequency signals were used. Behavioral and AER thresholds of four subjects were measured, using tone bursts of 250, 500, 4000, or 6000 Hz. The tone bursts had a 25-msec overall duration (5-msec rise/fall time and 15-msec plateau). The signals were presented every two seconds and the AER was computed on 50 samples. The differences between the AER and behavioral thresholds were approximately 10 dB for the 250- and 500-Hz signals and 20–22 dB for the 4000- and 6000-Hz signals. The implications of these results for the clinical application of AER are discussed.

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