Effects of Body Position on the Auditory System Effects of body position on auditory threshold acuity, the acoustic impedance at the tympanic membrane, and the middle ear muscle reflexes were investigated at 150, 250, and 500 Hz. Relative to the values obtained in the seated upright position, threshold acuity was reduced, the resistive and reactive components of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
Effects of Body Position on the Auditory System
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. H. Macrae
    Commonwealth Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
Effects of Body Position on the Auditory System
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 330-339. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.330
History: Received April 15, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 330-339. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.330
History: Received April 15, 1971

Effects of body position on auditory threshold acuity, the acoustic impedance at the tympanic membrane, and the middle ear muscle reflexes were investigated at 150, 250, and 500 Hz. Relative to the values obtained in the seated upright position, threshold acuity was reduced, the resistive and reactive components of the acoustic impedance were greater, and the effects of stapedius and tensor tympani muscle contractions on the compliance at the tympanic membrane were reduced in the inverted (upside-down) position. The increase in acoustic impedance, which is probably due to an increase in the hydrostatic pressure of the labyrinthine fluids, accounted for only about half the decrease in threshold acuity.

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