A Problem of Language Disorder: Length Versus Structure The effects of sentence length and structure on the accuracy of sentence repetition by 13 normal-speaking and 13 language-disordered children were compared. The sentences were from three to five words long and were primarily imperative, active-declarative, negative, and question sentences. All types of three-word sentences were repeated accurately by a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
A Problem of Language Disorder: Length Versus Structure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula Menyuk
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Patricia L. Looney
    Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
A Problem of Language Disorder: Length Versus Structure
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 264-279. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.264
History: Received July 22, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 264-279. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.264
History: Received July 22, 1971

The effects of sentence length and structure on the accuracy of sentence repetition by 13 normal-speaking and 13 language-disordered children were compared. The sentences were from three to five words long and were primarily imperative, active-declarative, negative, and question sentences. All types of three-word sentences were repeated accurately by a greater percentage of language-disordered children than were four- and five-word sentences, but the percentages of children accurately repeating these four- and five-word sentences did not differ significantly. Imperative and active-declarative sentences were repeated accurately by a greater percentage of language-disordered children and with fewer errors than were negative and question sentences. Length and structure had no significant effect on the accuracy of sentence repetition by normal-speaking children. Levels of repetition accuracy varied in the deviant-speaking population, and this appears to have important implications for therapeutic programming.

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