Differential Effectiveness of Six Information-Input Procedures Utilized to Teach Unfamiliar Sounds in Isolation Six procedures incorporating imitative, tactile, and descriptive input were used to teach six unfamiliar sounds in isolation. Comprehensive anatomical production sites, varied types of articulator production, and the overlaid presence or absence of vocal fold vibration were characteristics systematically included in the unfamiliar sounds. Each of the 36 subjects was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
Differential Effectiveness of Six Information-Input Procedures Utilized to Teach Unfamiliar Sounds in Isolation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John W. Wingo
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas
  • Michael Hoshiko
    Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
Differential Effectiveness of Six Information-Input Procedures Utilized to Teach Unfamiliar Sounds in Isolation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 256-263. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.256
History: Received October 7, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 256-263. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.256
History: Received October 7, 1969

Six procedures incorporating imitative, tactile, and descriptive input were used to teach six unfamiliar sounds in isolation. Comprehensive anatomical production sites, varied types of articulator production, and the overlaid presence or absence of vocal fold vibration were characteristics systematically included in the unfamiliar sounds. Each of the 36 subjects was taught one unfamiliar sound by each input procedure. Inputs incorporating imitative information produced the most short-range learning. Tactile information inputs appeared to be least effective. Inputs carrying two types of information were more effective than singular techniques for teaching the sounds as a group. Voiced sounds were easier to teach than voiceless sounds. No input type proved to be differentially more effective for sounds produced in relatively inaccessible areas of the posterior oral cavity. Although non-English sounds were necessarily utilized in this study, it is hypothesized that conclusions drawn from these results may be adaptable for articulation therapy procedures for English phonemes.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access