Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis Less than half of a series of 168 patients with multiple sclerosis presented significant speech deviations. The most frequent speech deviations observed were impaired loudness control and harshness; less frequently occurring deviations were defective articulation, restricted use of vocal variations for emphasis, poor pitch control, hypernasality, inappropriate pitch level, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1972
Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frederic L. Darley
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Joe R. Brown
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Norman P. Goldstein
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1972
Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 229-245. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.229
History: Received May 24, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1972, Vol. 15, 229-245. doi:10.1044/jshr.1502.229
History: Received May 24, 1971

Less than half of a series of 168 patients with multiple sclerosis presented significant speech deviations. The most frequent speech deviations observed were impaired loudness control and harshness; less frequently occurring deviations were defective articulation, restricted use of vocal variations for emphasis, poor pitch control, hypernasality, inappropriate pitch level, and breathiness. “Scanning speech” was not a prominent characteristic. Speech deviations were not solely attributable to cerebellar involvement. Their incidence was positively related to severity of neurologic involvement, becoming more prominent as additional motor systems were implicated.

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