Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Esophageal Speech Produced by Female Laryngectomees Voice fundamental frequency (VFF), phonation time, and duration characteristics were analyzed for 15 female and 18 male esophageal speakers to determine whether acoustic differences existed as a function of speaker sex. A significant difference was found between the mean fundamental frequency of esophageal speech produced by men and that produced ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1972
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Esophageal Speech Produced by Female Laryngectomees
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Suzanne Bennett
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1972
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Esophageal Speech Produced by Female Laryngectomees
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 211-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.211
History: Received December 21, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 211-216. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.211
History: Received December 21, 1970

Voice fundamental frequency (VFF), phonation time, and duration characteristics were analyzed for 15 female and 18 male esophageal speakers to determine whether acoustic differences existed as a function of speaker sex. A significant difference was found between the mean fundamental frequency of esophageal speech produced by men and that produced by women. The average VFF of women was approximately seven semitones higher than that established for men. Without regard to speaker sex, the average voice fundamental frequency for the total sample of 33 talkers was 24.9 semitones (69 Hz). Mean fundamental frequencies for individual speakers ranged from 12.9–43.7 semitones (33–200 Hz). No significant sex differences were found for VFF variability, phonation time, and duration measures. The findings highlight the need for investigators to control for acoustic differences between male and female esophageal speakers.

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