A Comparison of Phonemic and Graphemic Features of Eight English Consonants in Auditory and Visual Modes Eight English consonants in CV context were presented graphemically and phonemically in visual and auditory modalities for similarity judgments using the ABX method. An interpretation of two three-dimensional MD-SCAL configurations (Euclidean) of these judgments revealed the graphemic feature categories of form (vertical-rounded, vertical-crossed, and angular), place (labial and alveolar), and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1972
A Comparison of Phonemic and Graphemic Features of Eight English Consonants in Auditory and Visual Modes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Irma K. Jeter
    Howard University, Washington, D.C.
  • Sadanand Singh
    Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1972
A Comparison of Phonemic and Graphemic Features of Eight English Consonants in Auditory and Visual Modes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 201-210. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.201
History: Received April 19, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 201-210. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.201
History: Received April 19, 1971

Eight English consonants in CV context were presented graphemically and phonemically in visual and auditory modalities for similarity judgments using the ABX method. An interpretation of two three-dimensional MD-SCAL configurations (Euclidean) of these judgments revealed the graphemic feature categories of form (vertical-rounded, vertical-crossed, and angular), place (labial and alveolar), and manner (stop and continuant), and the phonemic feature categories of place (labial and alveolar), manner (stop and continuant), and voicing. The visual data had lower “stress,” hence a better fit, than the auditory data. The graphemic features were the better predictors of the visual mode than the phonemic features were of the auditory mode. Visual data showed higher multiple R (0.809) than the auditory data (0.677) when their MD-SCAL dimensions were correlated with the graphemic and phonemic features respectively. The commonality of the features place and manner in cueing visual and auditory judgments indicated the coding of these features at a higher cortical level than where these modalities are distinguished.

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