Ease of Articulation Two tasks required adults to estimate the muscular ease of articulating word-initial consonant phonemes. Ease ratings were positively correlated with Templin’s data (1957) on three-year-old children’s degree of mastery of these same phonemes. Three-year-olds' phoneme perception data (Koenigsknecht) were not correlated with phoneme production, lending mild support to a motor ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1972
Ease of Articulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John L. Locke
    Children’s Research Center, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1972
Ease of Articulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 194-200. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.194
History: Received October 14, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 194-200. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.194
History: Received October 14, 1970

Two tasks required adults to estimate the muscular ease of articulating word-initial consonant phonemes. Ease ratings were positively correlated with Templin’s data (1957) on three-year-old children’s degree of mastery of these same phonemes. Three-year-olds' phoneme perception data (Koenigsknecht) were not correlated with phoneme production, lending mild support to a motor ease hypothesis of phonological development. Children’s articulatory substitutions (Snow, 1963) also were found to be explainable on the basis of ease of articulation, with substituted phonemes receiving “easier” ratings than the target phonemes for which they were substituted. Adult ease ratings and children’s articulatory mastery of manner, place, and voicing features generally were in fairly close agreement. The significance of these findings is discussed, as well as certain problems presented by the use of adult ease ratings and data from disparate sources and populations.

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