Prediction of Stuttering by School-Age Stutterers Each of 84 stutterers, ranging in age from 8 to 16 years, indicated, before reading aloud each of 50 words, whether or not he expected to stutter when he said each word. The percent of stutterings predicted was determined for each of the 62 subjects who stuttered at least once. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1972
Prediction of Stuttering by School-Age Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Franklin H. Silverman
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1972
Prediction of Stuttering by School-Age Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 189-193. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.189
History: Received June 22, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1972, Vol. 15, 189-193. doi:10.1044/jshr.1501.189
History: Received June 22, 1971

Each of 84 stutterers, ranging in age from 8 to 16 years, indicated, before reading aloud each of 50 words, whether or not he expected to stutter when he said each word. The percent of stutterings predicted was determined for each of the 62 subjects who stuttered at least once. These stutterers varied considerably in their ability to predict their stuttering; the percentages of correct predictions ranged from 0 to 100. Approximately half failed to predict the majority of their stuttering. The older subjects were not significantly more accurate in their predictions than were the younger ones. Implications of the findings for the application of anticipatory-struggle hypotheses to the stuttering problems of children between the ages of 8 and 16 years are discussed.

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