The Role of Random Blackout Cues in the Distribution of Moments of Stuttering Johnson and Millsapps have shown that when stuttered words are blotted out in successive readings of a passage there is a tendency for residual stutterings to occur on adjacent words. They interpreted this to mean that the blottings serve as cues which remind the subjects of past stutterings. To verify ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1971
The Role of Random Blackout Cues in the Distribution of Moments of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda Rappaport
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1971
The Role of Random Blackout Cues in the Distribution of Moments of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 874-879. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.874
History: Received February 4, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 874-879. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.874
History: Received February 4, 1971

Johnson and Millsapps have shown that when stuttered words are blotted out in successive readings of a passage there is a tendency for residual stutterings to occur on adjacent words. They interpreted this to mean that the blottings serve as cues which remind the subjects of past stutterings. To verify this, the effect of blotting out words at random in the reading material was tested. Randomly blotted words produced an adjacency effect when following an ordinary adjacency condition, but when preceding it, did not. The inference was drawn that randomly placed blackout cues do not in themselves precipitate stuttering, but that subjects may readily be conditioned to stutter in response to them by prior experience with stuttering-related blots. Not only do blottings appear to gain the power to produce stuttering through association with past stuttering, as Johnson and Millsapps inferred, but this power seems to extend to new blottings, in a different reading passage, placed without regard to whether the words had been stuttered or not.

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