The Effects of Motor and Sensory Disruptions on Speech: A Description of Articulation Eleven spondee words produced by six dysarthric and two sensory-deprived speakers were phonetically transcribed in order to determine whether motor and sensory dysfunctions result in distinctive articulatory patterns. In general, the types of articulatory deviations produced by dysarthric speakers were different from those produced by speakers deprived of oral sensation. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1971
The Effects of Motor and Sensory Disruptions on Speech: A Description of Articulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cheryl M. Scott
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • R. L. Ringel
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1971
The Effects of Motor and Sensory Disruptions on Speech: A Description of Articulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 819-828. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.819
History: Received February 3, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 819-828. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.819
History: Received February 3, 1971

Eleven spondee words produced by six dysarthric and two sensory-deprived speakers were phonetically transcribed in order to determine whether motor and sensory dysfunctions result in distinctive articulatory patterns. In general, the types of articulatory deviations produced by dysarthric speakers were different from those produced by speakers deprived of oral sensation. Stop and fricative error patterns in particular appear to differentiate the two groups of speakers. The results serve to emphasize die unique contribution of information from peripheral oral receptors in the control of ongoing speech.

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